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Sugar Cookie

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A consultant working with New York City public schools on its implicit bias training allegedly told educators and staff that resources should be devoted to middle class black students over poor white ones.

A person present at the training in question told the Post that educational and racial equality strategist Dr. Darnisa Amante said:

'If I had a poor white male student and I had a middle-class black boy, I would actually put my equitable strategies and interventions into that middle class black boy because over the course of his lifetime he will have less access and less opportunities than that poor white boy. That’s what racial equity is.'

Dr. Amante is said to have made the statement during a workshop as part of New York City Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza's mandatory anti-bias training program for all Department of Education (DOE) employees.

The $23million program has come under fire from some including New York City Parents Union President Mona Davids, who said she was appalled by Dr. Amante's directives, calling them 'completely absurd.'

Davids took issue with this idea, saying the approach is racist in itself.

'It’s completely absurd,' Davids said. 'They want to treat black students as victims and punish white students. That defeats the purpose of what bias awareness training should be.'

Since Carranza was hired in April of 2018, four white female executives have been reassigned to lesser positions or stripped of duties and have now said they plan to sue the city because Carranza has created 'an environment which is hostile toward whites.

In a February training session, Dr. Amante addressed job security under Carranza's program.

'You are going to have to acknowledge that you will have to step back. You might fear losing your job,' she said.

'When we get to true racial equity you will have to define new institutional policies. This might feel dangerous because you are going to have to talk about race daily.'
 

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Sugar Cookie

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“When folks lump us with whites, we are being erased,” she said. “Our challenges and the struggles that our community has faced and is facing becomes invisible.”
A city DOE-sponsored panel designed to combat racism told parents that Asian-American students “benefit from white supremacy” and “proximity to white privilege,” an outraged mom told The Post.

The comments drew backlash from some parents and Asian activists, but not the Department of Education, which neither denied nor denounced them.

The panel was helmed by the Center for Racial Justice in Education, a group being paid about $400,000 by the DOE, led by Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza, to conduct near-weekly training sessions throughout the city to address what it believes is rampant racism infecting schools.

Two CRJE presenters at the February meeting — which included about 30 District 3 parents from the Upper West Side and Harlem in Manhattan — outlined a racial-advantage hierarchy, with African-Americans at the bottom and whites at the top, according to attendee Ingrid Flinn.

Flinn, who has an adopted Asian child, noted that Asians were never mentioned in the presentation and said that she felt compelled to ask about their status.

The presenters told the room that Asians were on the upper rungs, enough in “proximity to white privilege” to “benefit from white supremacy,” Flinn recalled.

Flinn said it suggested Asians didn’t need to be separately acknowledged in the hierarchy.

“I was offended,” she told The Post. “It was like Asians were just invisible. [But] they have their own problems, their own issues they have to deal with.

Wai Wah Chin of the Chinese American Citizens Alliance of Greater New York fumed, “This is racist and divisive.”
 

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Satanica

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I'm sure everyone's problems are due to race and not other socio-economic circumstances. :penguin: The only reason black students might need extra help and resources is because they're being told (or their parents) that they're entitled to it. Things like this are best determined on an individual, not a class, basis.
 

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Kittyskyfish

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I'm sure everyone's problems are due to race and not other socio-economic circumstances. :penguin: The only reason black students might need extra help and resources is because they're being told (or their parents) that they're entitled to it. Things like this are best determined on an individual, not a class, basis.
Student self-efficacy is influenced by peer pressure, at some level based in gender and racial stereotypes. More than a decade ago, high school students were interviewed about their academic performance. Their efforts to perform were influenced by how they thought others judged them, for better or worse. Asians were more likely to feel peer pressure to do better in maths because they were afraid to be 'that weird Asian who doesn't know algebra'. They do not want to stand out. Black kids, who generally do underperform in school because of socio-economic, community and family circumstances, have to overcome peer pressure within and outside their social group to do better. They too, do not want to stand out.

Students also internalize these stereotypes and can let it determine how much effort they put into studying. Depending on the stereotype, these attitudes can make achievement seem attainable or unreachable. For those who are seen as intelligent: "They are doing well in maths but I'm struggling. I must be doing something wrong. I'll try something else." Those in underperforming minorities: "My peers are failing and I'm struggling. I must be dumb like them. Why try."

DR. DARNISSA AMANTE HAS IT ALL WRONG. YOU NEVER UNDERCUT ONE CHILD TO HELP ANOTHER, NOR DO YOU PUBLICLY SINGLE A GROUP OUT AND SHOWER THEM WITH EXTRA HELP. Both dynamics foster inter-peer resentment and reinforce stereotypes that one group is inherently inferior.
 

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bmoore77

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'If I had a poor white male student and I had a middle-class black boy, I would actually put my equitable strategies and interventions into that middle class black boy because over the course of his lifetime he will have less access and less opportunities than that poor white boy. That’s what racial equity is.'

Someone needs a fucking Dictionary. That's an ignorant-ass statement right there.
 

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Satanica

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'If I had a poor white male student and I had a middle-class black boy, I would actually put my equitable strategies and interventions into that middle class black boy because over the course of his lifetime he will have less access and less opportunities than that poor white boy. That’s what racial equity is.'

Someone needs a fucking Dictionary. That's an ignorant-ass statement right there.
And that's the consultant, a PhD, no less, who's probably too busy trying to be relevant to look at a dictionary. Either that or Dr. Amante's statement was badly paraphrased by the attendee who quoted her.
 

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MildlyMedicated

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All children that struggle should be helped, these are children, not White children, Black children, Asian children, Hispanic children. Just children. Teach them all.
Or do they have to be ranked Dark to Light for access to services? Or vise versa ? Maybe just help the kids with medium range pigmentation????
When will we stop seeing other humans according to the shade of their skin? The key is we are all a product of our surroundings, why not show the next generations, not judge by skin, or by financial means, but judge by what each individual has to contribute as a fellow human.
Silly dream I know.
 

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