Person decapitated by helicopter at airport in Florida

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Satanica

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#1
https://www.kgun9.com/news/region-c...fter-incident-near-airport-in-hernando-county
BROOKSVILLE, Fla. — A death investigation is underway in Hernando County, Florida after a person was decapitated by a helicopter at Brooksville-Tampa Bay Regional Airport.

According to Hernando County Sheriff Al Nienhuis, they received a call for help around 3:35 p.m. on Thursday.

The FAA says the person was on the ground performing maintenance on the helicopter when they were struck.

When deputies arrived, they found a person dead near a hanger on airport property located along Flight Path Drive in Brooksville.

The identity of the victim has not released. Investigators are in the process of notifying next of kin.

Nienhuis said they are contacting the NAA and NTSB to see whether they will take over the investigation.

The sheriff said they will investigate thoroughly to rule out foul play, but at this time, "This does appear to be an accident," Nienhuis said.
 

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Alf

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#5
That would depend on the specific maintenance being done. If it was a legit procedure then there will be written guidance on how many people are required, where they will be stationed during the procedure, what they will be doing, what training they will have received,what part of that training is recurring, what intervals that training will recur at, what hazards and dangers exist, and how to mitigate those dangers, among other things. I wouldn't bet more than a nickel on this being a sanctioned procedure, though; I suspect it was an, "Oh s" moment.

There's been far more than one mechanic or passenger who has walked into a spinning rotor or propellor because they simply could not see the blades and didn't make the connection between the grey haze around the hub and the fact there was a fast-spinning blade there. A few have been televised.

--Al
 

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LFODBiker

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#6
@cubby - It could have been a couple of different things but best guess based what I've seen/read so far - After the maintenance guy disconnected the cart both he and the pilot probably weren't paying attention to their positions relative to each other. When the pilot gave the bird a quick bit of throttle it caused a slight vertical oscillation (bounce) which further translated to the rotor blades (even when spinning, they flex).

From the impact damage I saw on the rotor blades, that guy didn't know what hit him...
Small mercy.
 

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