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A shooting at a Walgreens pharmacy in Garner last month followed an argument over the taste of medicine a customer was given, according to a new search warrant in the case.

Stephen Allen Denning, 60, of 408 Henry Drive in Garner, is charged with two counts of assault with a deadly weapon with intent to kill inflicting serious injury and possession of a weapon of mass destruction in connection with the Valentine's Day shooting. He remains in the Wake County jail under $2 million bond.

Investigators say Denning shot Sarah Wright, the pharmacy manager who was working at the counter that day, in the chest from 3 to 4 feet away and that he shot another pharmacy employee, Brandon Gordon, in the head.

Wright spent almost two weeks in a hospital, while Gordon's condition was unknown Tuesday.

According to an application for a warrant to search Denning's 2007 Hyundai Tiburon, he was a regular customer at the Walgreens at 1116 U.S. Highway 70 but become belligerent over the taste of one of his medications.

"A victim later informed investigators that Denning was upset with pharmacy employees because his medication tasted funny. Denning demanded employees ... provide him with additional medication," the warrant application states. "Employees informed Denning they were not able to provide him with anything just prior to him shooting the two victims."
 

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Babs

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Was aggression one of the side effects of his med? You know how those pharmaceutical commercials tout how wonderful a drug is and then they quickly run through a litany of side effects? Like cancer, vomiting, greasy rectal discharge, etc.
 

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Old Man Metal

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Olestra?

--Al
That shit was done as soon as the FDA made them use the word "diarrhea" on the labelage of food products that used it. Slow-motion trainwreck, that one; laughed my ass off watching it at the time. The moral of the story: don't use Frankenfood ingredients that have been proven to make people shit themselves.

Idiots.

Was aggression one of the side effects of his med? You know how those pharmaceutical commercials tout how wonderful a drug is and then they quickly run through a litany of side effects? Like cancer, vomiting, greasy rectal discharge, etc.
"... and spontaneous ballistic discharge. If you are taking Dementol and you experience spontaneous ballistic discharge, call 911 immediately."
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It’s only funny because he thinks “taste” is something pharmaceutical companies actually give a shit about. Even paediatric medication is awful!
There is actually a fairly common perception, that I have heard expressed multiple times over the years, that "medicine that tastes good can't possibly be effective." My paternal grandmother was one person who believed this. Having grown up when she did (born in 1912, I think) and where she did (the rural South), with home-remedies and clasically-influenced (read: Colonial herbalism) doctors and pharmacists who made their own concoctions from (usually bitter) herbs and such, this is really not too surprising a mindset.

I spent a college summer working in a Quality Control lab at a P&G facility that made, among other things, cough drops. The smallest cough drop line, by far, was an old-school Vicks cough drop, I'm spacing on the name, but it was a legacy line descended from their original cough drop, was based on dextromethorphan, and it was foul-tasting as all-git-out. They only ran it every few weeks (most of the product lines ran every day), just enough to supply old folks who didn't want a cough drop that "tasted good," the wanted one that "worked."

Funnily enough, dextromethorphan is very effective.
 
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