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A Mount Vernon man pleaded guilty in connection to the 2018 death of his 2-year-old son, officials said Thursday.

Lloyd Scott, 35, pleaded guilty to felony first degree manslaughter. The Westchester County District Attorney’s Office says he’s been promised a sentence of 21 years in state prison with five years of post-release supervision.

Scott was arrested in April 2018, when the child’s mother found the toddler unconscious.

Officials say Scott was alone with the boy while the mother was at work.

According to the DA, Scott beat the toddler, put him in bed and told the boy’s mother that her son was sleeping when she arrived home.

When she checked on her son, he was not breathing and was covered in bruises on his face and torso, according to the DA.

The child was pronounced dead at the hospital, and Scott was arrested later that night. He was charged with murder.

The medical examiner said the child had blunt force trauma to his body, including lacerations to his liver, pancreas and intestines.
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Kaleb Carvalho was so badly beaten that his tiny body was covered with bruises and cuts, and a coroner's report later determined he had suffered severe internal injuries to multiple internal organs.

The 2 1/2-year-old Mount Vernon toddler had "multiple" cuts to his mouth and lip, and several bruises on his body indicate that he was likely bitten, Westchester County prosecutors said in court papers reviewed by The Journal News/lohud.

Prosecutors said clothes that Carvalho wore — a jacket, pants and a pair of "onesies" — tested positive for saliva or blood. Blood was even found on a drill his father was seen carrying from the scene on surveillance video on April 16, shortly before he drove the boy to Montefiore Mount Vernon Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

"Emergency room personnel were unable to ever revive Kaleb," court papers said. "As they tried, they asked Ms. Carvalho to identify who was responsible for inflicting the injuries on the child and she told them it was the child's father, the defendant."

"In the presence of hospital and police personnel, Ms. Carvalho called the defendant on his cell phone from inside the emergency room and asked the defendant what he had done to the child," the papers said. "And the defendant answered 'I didn't go at him too hard.' When she asked him to explain what he meant, the defendant hung up."
 
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McDanel

Trusted Member
Bold Member!
Yeah, but after late adolescence/ early twenties, oughtn’t the prefrontal cortex be fully formed and capable of impulse control, etc?
Clearly not always. Google Intermittent Explosive Disorder, or Limbic Rage.

ETA: I loved and lived with a sufferer. The brain tumor diagnosis was almost a relief. The Risperidal was his salvation.
 
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Ripley

Better to be pissed off than pissed on
Bold Member!
Yeah, brain injury can cause that. Phineas Gage is a good case study I learned about in Psychology.
After several years Phineas’ brain healed enough for him to start functioning more normally. Once modern doctors learned that part, they started to understand that the brain is more plastic than originally thought.

A report of Gage's physical and mental condition shortly before his death implies that his most serious mental changes were temporary, so that in later life he was far more functional, and socially far better adapted, than in the years immediately following his accident. A social recovery hypothesis suggests that his work as a stagecoach driver in Chile fostered this recovery by providing daily structure which allowed him to regain lost social and personal skills.

 

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Angry panda

Member
I’ve raised my two children to 22 and 13 years old respectively, without ever laying a finger on them.

It’s staggers me that people can’t be self controlled enough to not assault babies, toddlers and children.

What the fuck is wrong in someone’s brain to think it’s ok to beat a child.

This forum hurts my soul. Human kind hurts my spirit. I struggle to find any good in the world after reading some of the stories on here, then in the news and on TV.
 
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Granmaw

Well-Known Member
Where are the charges against the mother? There is no way in hell this was the first time he beat that baby, and no way in hell she didn't know it was going on. Both need to be locked up and have their ass beat repeatedly.

'I didn't go at him too hard.'

Oooooh, this makes my blood boil! It ain't ok to EVER "go at" a 2 year old you slag mouthed creatin!
 

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