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Keepalowprofile

Water is for people that don't have coffee.
Bold Member!

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A CABIN crew working for Korean Air was demoted from his position after he stopped a pilot from drinking during a flight and reported him.

In a bizarre twist, the airline is said to have only given the pilot a warning over the incident.
 

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knockout

The Californian
Bold Member!
I remember this one

Oakland, He Said, but He Went to Auckland Instead
An Oakland man mistook a flight to "Auckland" for one to his hometown and added 12,000 miles to his journey from a holiday in West Germany, customs officials said Tuesday.

Michael Lewis, 22, was at Los Angeles International Airport intending to fly to the Bay area city, 400 miles north, when Air New Zealand officials allowed him to board an aircraft bound for Auckland.
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My flight from Europe was given away after I had confirmed a week earlier, to make up for it they put me and a friend in first class, guess I can’t complain, had filet mignon, Dom Perignon and Remy Martin all the way home
 
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Keepalowprofile

Water is for people that don't have coffee.
Bold Member!
I remember this one


Post automatically merged:

My flight from Europe was given away after I had confirmed a week earlier, to make up for it they put me and a friend in first class, guess I can’t complain, had filet mignon, Dom Perignon and Remy Martin all the way home
Might be a cheap way to get a vacation to Europe.

Edit
Just get on the wrong air craft, play dumb if you're caught.
 
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Keepalowprofile

Water is for people that don't have coffee.
Bold Member!

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Satanica

Veteran Member
Bold Member!
Air Transat passengers said they endured a painful six hours with little or no food, scant information and often no air conditioning while their plane sat on a hot tarmac at an airport in Rome earlier this week.

"It was really, really bad. I never believed that an airplane on the inside could be that hot," said passenger Stephen Faria-Wong. "It's not fair to somebody who has paid for a service, you know, and have to be tortured in this way."

The Monday flight — destined for Toronto — had 336 travellers onboard. Outside, the temperature hovered around 30 C.

Air Transat said it grounded the plane at Leonardo da Vinci International Airport due to a mechanical problem and, after six hours, had to cancel the flight altogether because the crew had hit their limit on working hours.

Passengers were then herded back to the airport and eventually bused to a hotel for the night. The plane took off the following afternoon, close to 24 hours after it was originally scheduled to leave.
[....]
The incident comes on the heels of new federal air passenger regulations mandating that airlines provide proper air conditioning, food and constant information updates during a tarmac delay.

The mishap also follows a Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA) ruling that Air Transat violated its own rules in July 2017, when two of its planes were delayed on the tarmac for more than four hours at the Ottawa airport. One of those planes had no air conditioning or food and water for passengers.

Air Transat was fined $295,000 and the CTA ordered the airline to make changes to avoid similar incidents in the future.

In a statement Wednesday, Air Transat told CBC News it did everything it could to accommodate passengers who were stuck on the tarmac in Rome.

"We would like to reiterate to our passengers that we are sorry for any inconvenience this may have caused, but confirm that we have done our best to ensure their comfort by providing snacks and water, activating the air conditioning system as soon as possible and communicating regularly," spokesperson Debbie Cabana said in an email.

But the passengers interviewed by CBC News told a somewhat different story. Each said the air conditioning wasn't working for most of the six-hour delay and that they were only offered water — although a couple passengers said they managed to snag a small snack.
[....]
About halfway into the delay, Air Transat opened the aircraft's doors and allowed people to stand outside on stairs that had been attached to the plane, Grubisa said. But the respite was short-lived because security arrived and shooed them back in.

"We were out about 20 to 30 minutes, then the police came down from the airport and told us, 'You know, you can't be out of the plane,'" he said.

Air Transat said it allowed passengers to leave the plane and return to the airport about three hours in, which added to the tarmac delay due to logistical issues, such as arranging transport to the terminal.

According to the passengers, most people remained onboard, as they were under the impression that anyone who left would have to find their own way home.

"They did actually say it was on our own terms if we wanted to leave the plane," said Franca Collia, a passenger who lives in Mississauga, Ont. "There was no compensation for that."

Passengers also received little information from the airline about what was going on both during the tarmac delay and after everyone had to disembark, she said.
[....]
Under the new Canadian regulations, passengers receive $1,000 each for delays longer than nine hours — but that rule doesn't take effect until Dec. 15

And even then, it likely wouldn't apply to a situation like this Air Transat incident, as compensation is designated for delays that are within an airline's control and don't relate to safety. An unplanned mechanical problem would typically be considered a safety issue.

Fortunately for these passengers, because the plane was departing Europe, European rules apply, which stipulate that airlines must dole out €600 ($877) for long-distance flight delays.

Air Transat confirmed that passengers will each receive that amount.

But some passengers feel that's not enough; they also want the airline to be held accountable for its treatment of passengers during the ordeal.

"We were treated inhumanely," said Faria-Wong. "The government should do something about this."

The Canadian Transportation Agency said it's looking into the situation.
 

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BuffettGirl

Well-Known Member
Bold Member!

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Sue sue

Take 6
Bold Member!
First of all, why are these yokels destroying the planet by flying from Chicago to South Bend? It only takes half an hour longer to drive (1 h 29 min vs 1.54 min)... But come on, she's the flight attendant, she's not the pilot. Were people really "scared to death"?
I though the same. What if she had low blood sugar?
 

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Alf

Keeper of the Dowager Tabby
Staff member
But come on, she's the flight attendant, she's not the pilot.
Flying has been described as hours of utter boredom interspersed with moments of sheer terror. During those moments the pilots are busy aviating, navigating, and communicating; they literally do not have time to direct and guide the passengers. That responsibility falls upon the shoulders of the flight attendants.

Those moments are when pilots, and flight attendants, earn every last penny of what they get paid.

--Al
 

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BuffettGirl

Well-Known Member
Bold Member!
Flying has been described as hours of utter boredom interspersed with moments of sheer terror. During those moments the pilots are busy aviating, navigating, and communicating; they literally do not have time to direct and guide the passengers. That responsibility falls upon the shoulders of the flight attendants.

Those moments are when pilots, and flight attendants, earn every last penny of what they get paid.

--Al
I get that. I really do and I agree with you. I just think the phrase "scared to death" is so trite and overused. Scared, terrified, frightened, why even fearful or aghast would be more fitting than one more person that claims they were scared to death, but they're still walking and talking. Know what I mean? ;)
 

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Satanica

Veteran Member
Bold Member!
[....]
Delta flight 2385 was scheduled to depart New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport just before 4 p.m. Thursday, but it didn't actually take to the sky until shortly before midnight because of inclement weather.

That left frustrated passengers stuck on the tarmac for almost eight hours.

Passengers who took to Twitter to vent their frustrations said at one point a fight broke out, prompting police intervention.
[....]
Two passengers told ABC News they weren't offered for water for about two hours and never offered food, but Delta denied those accounts.

"Customers were offered both water and snack service while on the tarmac and were also offered the chance to take a bus back to the terminal, given the plane was parked on a remote pad for quite some time," Delta said in a statement. "We apologize for the inconvenience and the plane has since taken off for Miami."
 

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Keepalowprofile

Water is for people that don't have coffee.
Bold Member!


This is so fucked up.
. traveler passing through security at Rochester International Airport got an unexpected sick burn from an employee — when she handed him a folded-up note that said, “You ugly!!!”
 

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Satanica

Veteran Member
Bold Member!
A man says crew members on a SkyWest Airlines flight refused to allow his brother with autism to sit near a family member Friday and walked off the plane, forcing all 75 passengers to deplane and board another flight three hours later.

Now, the crew, including the pilots, have been grounded while the airline investigates the incident.


Ayomide Isola, 23, was on SkyWest flight 3596 from Detroit to Houston with his mother, sister and 21-year-old brother, Tayo, who is nonverbal and unable to express himself. SkyWest is a connection carrier for Delta and other major airlines.

Isola, a graduate student at the University of Houston, said in a now-viral Facebook post that he and his family arrived at the gate to learn they were all seated apart. They were among the last people to board the flight because a U.S. Customs and Border Protection computer outage caused hours-long delays at airports Friday, he said.

a woman quickly volunteered to switch seats with Tayo so he could be near his sister during the more than two-hour flight.
[....]
"My brother has to sit with one of our family members he is comfortable with," Isola told NBC News on Monday.

A flight attendant became outraged and approached Tayo to tell him he needed to return to his assigned seat, Isola said. But his brother could not oblige because he does not respond to verbal cues.

Isola said he and his family explained to the flight attendant that Tayo is special needs and "that this small accommodation would be necessary." But she would not relent, he said, and instead, brought in a gate supervisor who sided with the family.

"The supervisor was like, 'That happens all the time,'" Isola said. "She was confused as to why the flight attendant was making such a big deal about it."

Other passengers on the flight were defending the family and telling the flight attendant she was being discriminatory, Isola said.

After already being delayed for nearly an hour, the flight attendant then consulted the pilot and advocated for the family and the passenger who switched seats with Tayo to be booted from the flight. She told the pilot they were a "safety hazard," Isola said.

After a discussion with the pilot and flight attendant, Isola said the pilot instructed everyone on the plane to exit the aircraft.

Airport security meanwhile told the pilot there was no safety issue and that the flight should resume, according to Isola.

The pilot and his crew refused and exited the terminal, Isola said. He and the 74 other passengers had to exit the aircraft and wait three hours for a new crew to board the plane.

"When the new crew came in, everything went smoothly," Isola said.

Isola said he shared his experience to highlight the "ignorant, bigotry and blatant discrimination that unfortunately exists in people today."

"It is not right to treat people with special needs as if they are unworthy of your time or effort," he said. "They are people first, defined by all of their abilities and not condemned by their disabilities."

“Delta apologizes to customers on flight 3596, operated by Delta Connection partner SkyWest, for any inconvenience following an onboard event," a spokeswoman told NBC News.

SkyWest acknowledged the flight experienced a delay in boarding "as a result of an issue regarding customer seat assignments," and said it was investigating the incident. According to a spokeswoman, the crew was initially unaware of the traveler’s disability.

"We are committed to providing exceptional onboard service to all of our customers and are working with our partner Delta to reach out to the customers," the spokeswoman said.

Isola said he doesn't believe the crew should be allowed to fly any longer. If they are, the airline should require they undergo sensitivity training, he said.

"There’s a certain sensitivity level, compassion level you need to have to fly with travelers who have disabilities," Isola said. "And if you can’t do that, then you shouldn’t be in this business."
I would fire the flight attendant at the least. It's concerning the the entire flight crew exhibited the same lack of judgment.

 

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Satanica

Veteran Member
Bold Member!
[....]
Sam Trail, of Houston, said he and his wife were forced to sit in a seat with fresh vomit on the back, of the seat in front of them, the floor and the seat itself.

"The seat in front of me was covered with vomit," Trail said. "They kept boarding the people and so we couldn't move. We basically had our luggage in our laps trying to avoid contact with the vomit."

They said they were on United Flight 2057 from Vancouver to Houston on Sunday afternoon.

Trail said that when he alerted the flight crew of the vomit, they were more concerned with the departure time.

"I was told, 'Oh, yeah, we can get a cleaning crew, but you're going to be the reason this flight is delayed,'" Trail said.

Trail said a flight attendant handed him a wad of paper towels to clean the vomit before a cleaning person boarded the plane with a spray bottle and towel. Trail said the vomit was not totally cleaned when they sat down.

"There's gotta be some limitations. I mean you have to provide a sanitary environment and there should be an apology," he said.
[....]
"We're disappointed that this aircraft did not meet our standards for cleanliness. Once the issue was brought to our crew's attention, cabin cleaners were called on board to clean the seat prior to departure."

United Airlines said it has reached out to the Trails for further discussion.

The Trails said they would like an apology.
 

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