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knockout

The Californian
Why on earth would that make a difference ... and of course you glossed right over the fact that she had legal sovereignty.

Same as Eric had a right to be arrested according to the policy the officer was directed to follow, and not by some

cowboy who murdered him in the street
I want to know Incase I ever kill anyone, I want those jurors, it’ll be like hitting the lotto
 

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lithiumgirl

Pretty Nice Troll
@Buffettgirl ... its a lot of work to become soverign
For someone who has been in legal trouble before, you have a frightening lack of knowledge about how law actually works. Think what you want, but maybe drop by your attorney's office, lay a hundred bucks them and ask their opinion before you try this crap on a cop or judge.

I'm not a sovereign citizen ... but if I was and my rights were violated ... I'd definitely see an attorney.

I'm a criminal ... I've never had a bad arrest ... never been assaulted by the police. I have some idea how the law works.

I don't need a lesson from you ... you dig ?
 

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lithiumgirl

Pretty Nice Troll
Even when I thought I had, it ended with "too bad, there's no such thing..."

They gave her family 38 million ... she had the shot gun and was firing at the police and they still gave her family 38 million.

Would they do they do that if it wasn't a thing ???
 

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lithiumgirl

Pretty Nice Troll
Again Lith, that's a half-truth. The whole whole truth would be "I don't need a lesson from you, I need a lesson from someone with far more patience than you... You dig?".

No man ... I just don't need a lesson from you ... from a person with more patience than you (fucking soft) or anyone really.

Get the fuck away from me ...
 

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knockout

The Californian
@Buffettgirl ... its a lot of work to become soverign



I'm not a sovereign citizen ... but if I was and my rights were violated ... I'd definitely see an attorney.

I'm a criminal ... I've never had a bad arrest ... never been assaulted by the police. I have some idea how the law works.

I don't need a lesson from you ... you dig ?
You go girl, show those non sovereign pigs who’s boss
 

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lithiumgirl

Pretty Nice Troll
I think ends up being a lot of work to let the government know that you're going to be a giant pain in the ass... I can't find where it's legal.

It is a lot of work ... I have a friend who is sovereign. He doesn't pay car insurance, doesn't pay for tags ... doesn't pay taxes at all.

Doesn't pay for utilities ... has land which he purchased cheap. He's a doctor ... totally established, mostly sound.
 

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lithiumgirl

Pretty Nice Troll
You go girl, show those non sovereign pigs who’s boss
Watch your mouth man ... at no time did I say I was anti -police or that people who were non-sovereign were pigs.

Those are your words and I resent that you would even try to attach them to me ...
 

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CentreAussie

Well-Known Member
Bold Member!
I think ends up being a lot of work to let the government know that you're going to be a giant pain in the ass... I can't find where it's legal.
It's conspiracy theory, based in extreme right-wing politics and anti-authoritarianism. The argument sums up as "The government of 'X' country is illegitimate therefore I don't have to obey their laws". This crap even has a foot-hold down under and in NZ. I wasn't exaggerating when I said it was as retarded as the Illuminati lizard-people NWO.
 

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lithiumgirl

Pretty Nice Troll
The laugh was for "mostly sound". Maybe it's different in Canada? I'm not looking there.

Well you're right ... We're Canadian, but 38 million says sovereign citizens exist in the USA and pretty much everywhere.

Its a process ... you can't just declare that you're sovereign and expect the police to back off ... but if you whip out your documents that prove it

... then that's different. Then they should simply wave you through ... wish you a nice day like they would if you weren't and they

just handed you a fist full of tickets. Ms.I will kill you if you don't leave my house now ... had documents.
 

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knockout

The Californian
Some sovereign dude gets nailed evey now and then for not paying taxes

Local 'sovereign citizen' learns that tax evasion leads to prison
Harold Stanley of Peculiar was sentenced to five years in federal prison without parole for evading nearly $1 million in taxes in the past decade, despite claiming that he’s a "sovereign citizen" and not subject to the law

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.bizjournals.com/kansascity/news/2016/11/17/sovereign-citizen-tax-evasion-prison-sentence.amp.html
 
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lithiumgirl

Pretty Nice Troll
A

Like I said, I think it's a process to prove how much of a dick someone is going to be, and which 911 calls they can ignore. 'cause on my watch, you wanna opt out, you get none of the perks...
These people don't want the perks ... that's the point.
 

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Satanica

Veteran Member
Bold Member!
NEW YORK (Reuters) - The New York City medical examiner who conducted an autopsy on an unarmed black man who died during an attempted arrest in 2014 told a hearing that the policeman who subdued the suspect used a chokehold that triggered the “lethal cascade” that killed him.
[....]
The New York Police Department, which is conducting a hearing for Pantaleo that could lead to his dismissal, nearly five years after Garner’s death, has banned its officers from using chokeholds for decades, saying the maneuver is too risky.

“In my opinion, that’s a chokehold,” Floriana Persechino, the medical examiner who wrote the autopsy report told the hearing, referring to cellphone video footage of the encounter. She said the chokehold triggered “a lethal cascade of events” that led to Garner’s death.

Using a green laser pointer, she pointed to autopsy photographs showing ruptured blood vessels in Garner’s neck, saying they were caused by the chokehold.
[....]
In hearings this week at the New York Police Department’s headquarters in Manhattan, Pantaleo’s lawyers have argued that he did not use a chokehold in restraining Garner while arresting him and that the officer did not cause Garner’s death.

A summary of the autopsy shared with reporters in 2014 ruled that the cause of death was: “Compression of neck (choke hold), compression of chest and prone positioning during physical restraint by police.”

It also said that Garner’s asthma, obesity and high blood pressure were “contributing conditions.” Garner was 43 when he died.
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-police-garner/new-york-medical-examiner-testifies-chokehold-led-to-eric-garners-death-idUSKCN1SL12V?feedType=RSS&feedName=domesticNews
 

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Satanica

Veteran Member
Bold Member!
NEW YORK (AP) — After Eric Garner’s death following a confrontation with New York City police five years ago, one officer involved in the struggle wrote up paperwork that exaggerated the seriousness of the dead man’s suspected crime, that officer testified Tuesday.

Officer Justin Damico said that after riding in an ambulance with the dying Garner, he filled out arrest papers listing a felony tax charge that would have required prosecutors to prove Garner, a small-time street hustler, had sold 10,000 untaxed cigarettes.

Damico was questioned about the posthumous arrest papers while testifying at the disciplinary trial of Officer Daniel Pantaleo, a one-time partner accused of restraining Garner with a banned chokehold as they tried to arrest him for selling loose, untaxed cigarettes on Staten Island in July 2014.
[....]
Damico acknowledged that the felony charge was incorrect because Garner actually had with him five packs of Newports that contained a total of less than 100 cigarettes. The cigarettes were marked for sale in Virginia, a sign they were being resold illegally in New York.

Garner was ultimately posthumously charged with two misdemeanors, which alleged he resisted arrest and sold untaxed cigarettes. The case was not prosecuted because Garner is dead.
[....]
Speaking for more than an hour in a nearly full hearing room at police headquarters, Damico recounted how he’d given an agitated Garner a warning two weeks earlier, instead of arresting him, for selling loose cigarettes because he felt that approach was “the right thing to do.”

Once Pantaleo grabbed Garner and pulled him to the ground, Damico said he just assumed that Garner was faking unresponsiveness — “playing possum” — to get out of being arrested. An officer who arrived as Garner was being restrained testified that he had the same thought.
[....]
Damico testified he saw Pantaleo’s arm around Garner’s neck as the two men struggled — but he didn’t say if he thought the move was a chokehold.
[....]
Damico, then in charge of combatting graffiti and quality of life issues in a neighborhood near the Staten Island Ferry terminal, said he was paired with Pantaleo to watch for loose cigarette sales when he saw Garner completing such a transaction.

Damico, who hasn’t faced disciplinary action, testified that he and Pantaleo didn’t rush to arrest Garner because they were “trying to avoid a physical fight.” They stayed calm as Garner screamed for around 10 minutes about feeling targeted by police and swatted Damico’s hands away while refusing to be arrested, Damico said.

Pat Lynch, the president of the Police Benevolent Association officers’ union, said Damico and Pantaleo “utilized textbook de-escalation techniques to limit the use of force against a much larger and irate individual.”

“We are convinced that if the politics of the streets are removed from this process and the case is decided on a dispassionate hearing of the facts, that Police Officer Pantaleo will be exonerated,” he said.

The NYPD’s disciplinary process plays out like a trial in front of an administrative judge.

Normally the purpose is to determine whether an officer violated department rules, but that’s only if disciplinary charges are filed within 18 months of an incident.

Because Pantaleo’s case languished, the watchdog Civilian Complaint Review Board must show that his actions rose to the level of criminal conduct, even though he faces no criminal charges and is being tried in a department tribunal, not a criminal court.

The final decision on any punishment lies with the police commissioner. Penalties range from the loss of vacation days to firing.

The disciplinary hearing is scheduled to resume June 5.
[....]
 

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