• You must be logged in to see or use the chatbox


Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!

biteme

The Rev, Molon labe
are you kidding? bad cops cost the areas they are allowed to florish more than any other group. And as far as calling a career criminal if in trouble in some areas you would get more help but the big issue is we aren't paying career criminals with our tax money and they don't have blanket immunity or a whole mega network of people willing to cover them and shiesty lawyers willing to rationalize their crimes and demonize the victims to make them look better
No one cost you more than this asshole, want to protect your city from expensive riots

Want to influence a casino bid? Polish your corporate image? Not be labeled a racist?

Then you need to pay Al Sharpton.

For more than a decade, corporations have shelled out thousands of dollars in donations and consulting fees to Sharpton’s National Action Network. What they get in return is the reverend’s supposed sway in the black community or, more often, his silence
http://nypost.com/2015/01/04/how-sharpton-gets-paid-to-not-cry-racism-at-corporations/
He's the presidents advisor, he don't need to pay no bills, shut the fuck up or he'll burn down your neighborhood

Lessons From Rev. Al Sharpton's $4.5 Million Tax Bill

Civil rights leader Reverend Al Sharpton is in the headlines again, but not for Ferguson or civil rights issues this time. A New York Times reportsays that the now svelte Reverend and his for-profit businesses owe a chubby $4.5 million in state and federal taxes. It isn’t only the taxman that is not being paid, according to reports. Even worthy causes like hotels, landlords, and travel agencies are getting the cold shoulder from Mr. Sharpton or from his advocacy organization, the National Action Network.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/robertwood/2014/11/19/lessons-from-rev-al-sharptons-4-5-million-tax-bill/
 
Last edited:

Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!

Satanica

Veteran Member
Bold Member!
http://bigstory.ap.org/c77a49667a744756a591880ef5fc667f
NEW YORK (AP) — The hospital center that dispatched paramedics and treated Eric Garner as he died after being placed into a chokehold by police has agreed to pay $1 million to the family, according to court records obtained Tuesday by The Associated Press.

The settlement with Richmond University Medical Center is confidential and wasn't part of the $5.9 million agreement announced by the city in July. But the figure was disclosed in court documents filed in Surrogate's Court on Staten Island that outline how the money will be dispersed to his family. Garner left no will.

The figure is the maximum claim allowed under the hospital center's liability insurance policy, according to court papers.
[....]
Emergency workers arrive after officers call 911, check his pulse and make sure he's breathing before placing him on the stretcher.

"Sir, it's EMS. We're here to help you. We're getting the stretcher, all right?" one worker says to Garner when they arrive at 3:36 p.m.

He does not answer.

Later, when a bystander asks on video why they aren't trying to resuscitate him, an officer says it's because Garner is breathing.

"The EMTs did not conduct the appropriate examination" of Garner at the scene and "failed to provide him with the necessary life-saving procedures," according to the court documents.

Hospital records, also filed in the documents, say Garner went into cardiac arrest on the stretcher. The medics tried to resuscitate Garner in the ambulance and doctors again performed CPR at the emergency room. By 4:15, he had no pulse, and he was declared dead at 4:34 p.m. The medical examiner determined his death was caused by the chokehold and restraint by police, coupled with acute asthma, obesity — Garner weighed 395 pounds and was 6-foot-2 — and heart disease.

Two paramedics and two emergency medical technicians were initially suspended without pay by the hospital, but they were reinstated into roles that did not involve patient care.
[....]
Garner's widow will received about $2.4 million. His children will receive sums that range from $195,000 to $996,000. His mother, Gwen Carr, will receive $124,000 for acting as administrator of his estate, and the law firm that represented the family will receive $2.3 million, or one-third, which is a common attorney fee. The family's first attorney, Sanford Rubenstein, fired amid an unrelated sex assault investigation where he was eventually cleared, also requested an undisclosed sum, which the family is disputing.

A judge set a hearing for March 16 to formalize the proposal.
[....]
 

Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!


Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!


Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!


Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!


Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!

Satanica

Veteran Member
Bold Member!
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/25/nyregion/justice-dept-replaces-investigators-on-eric-garner-case.html?smid=tw-nytimes&smtyp=cur&referer=http:/www.breakingnews.com/&_r=0
The Justice Department has replaced the New York team of agents and lawyers investigating the death of Eric Garner, officials said, a highly unusual shake-up that could jump-start the long-stalled case and put the government back on track to seek criminal charges.

Mr. Garner, 43, died in 2014 on a Staten Island street corner, where two police officers confronted him and accused him of selling untaxed cigarettes. One of the officers, Daniel Pantaleo, was seen on a video using a chokehold, prohibited by the New York Police Department, to subdue him. Mr. Garner’s last words, “I can’t breathe,” became a rallying cry for protesters around the country.

Federal authorities have been investigating whether officers violated Mr. Garner’s civil rights in his fatal encounter with the police. But the case had been slowed by a dispute because federal prosecutors and Federal Bureau of Investigation officials in New York opposed bringing charges, while prosecutors with the Civil Rights Division at the Justice Department in Washington argued there was clear evidence to do so.
[....]
In recent weeks, the F.B.I. agents who have been investigating the case were replaced with agents from outside New York, according to five federal officials in New York and Washington. Federal prosecutors in Brooklyn are no longer assigned to the case. It is not clear whether civil rights prosecutors from Washington will work alone in presenting evidence to a grand jury in Brooklyn and in trying the case if charges are eventually brought.

The officials who described the reorganization did so on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss it publicly.

Mr. Garner’s death, followed by the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., and several other high-profile deadly police encounters across the country, prompted nationwide protests over how and when officers use force, particularly against black men. Though the Justice Department has required police departments to stop unconstitutional practices and retrain officers, it has rarely brought charges against individual officers in deadly encounters.

To do so in the Garner case, prosecutors must persuade a grand jury that a crime occurred. Normally, that is all but guaranteed and an indictment follows. But Officer Pantaleo’s testimony helped persuade a state grand jury on Staten Island not to bring charges in December 2014. Any decision on charges in the federal case is probably months away, officials said.

The Justice Department and the F.B.I. did not comment.

Stuart London, a lawyer for Officer Pantaleo, said that he had maintained he never violated anyone’s civil rights. “This was always a simple street encounter where Officer Pantaleo utilized his N.Y.P.D. training to subdue an individual,” Mr. London said.

He added: “If it is true that the Justice Department is rejecting the recommendations of seasoned F.B.I. agents and assistant United States attorneys, this is a gross miscarriage of justice. In our system of justice, politics should never take the place of the rule of law.”

Officer Pantaleo was stripped of his badge and gun two days after Mr. Garner’s death, and he has remained on desk duty. But as is typical in such cases, departmental hearings that could lead to his dismissal have been delayed during the criminal investigations.
[....]
Prosecuting police officers is difficult even when investigators agree about the strength of the case. In the Garner case, the Justice Department is moving forward knowing that a team of agents and prosecutors believes the case should not be brought. If it goes to trial, defense lawyers would probably try to exploit that division and use it to sow doubt.
[....]
Another complicating factor, according to three federal officials, is that the disagreement between Washington and New York is reflected in the F.B.I. reports, which often become evidence at trial.
[....]
Two years ago, when Eric H. Holder Jr. was attorney general, he told colleagues that the evidence made clear that the Justice Department should bring charges, according to a former department official. Prosecutors might lose, he said, but the government had to bring the case. Career civil rights prosecutors agreed.

Prosecutors in New York, though, strongly disagreed with that analysis. The dispute hinged on whether Officer Pantaleo intended to violate Mr. Garner’s civil rights. Officer Pantaleo has said he did not mean to put Mr. Garner in a chokehold. The officer said he tried to use a maneuver that involved hooking an arm underneath one of Mr. Garner’s arms while wrapping the other around his torso. During the struggle, Officer Pantaleo said he feared he would be pushed through a storefront window behind him.

Prosecutors and F.B.I. agents in New York argued that video captured by a bystander supported Officer Pantaleo’s account. Civil rights prosecutors in Washington disagreed, saying it showed evidence of willful wrongdoing.

Attorney General Lynch came into office last year in the middle of that dispute. She has a reputation for being deferential to prosecutors in the field rather than dictating from Washington. But she has also heavily relied on the advice of her civil rights prosecutors, who are more removed from the local police departments that they investigate.
 

Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!

Pete Bondurant

Veteran Member
The fat fuck died of a heart attack while resisting arrest. The Obama administration wants to make a federal case out of something that does not merit such scrutiny. They did this with that little bastard Trayvon Martin, and it blew up in their face.
 

Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!

lithiumgirl

Pretty Nice Troll
The fat fuck died
He died period .... I've been arrested with cocaine (a lot of it) in the trunk of my car with less
drama than this. He was obese, he did have a heart condition...what was he going to do...RUN AWAY. Nobody should be dying during arrest. People that shoot at or get stabby with cops are the exception and this guy wasn't either.
 

Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!

Pete Bondurant

Veteran Member
He died period .... I've been arrested with cocaine (a lot of it) in the trunk of my car with less
drama than this. He was obese, he did have a heart condition...what was he going to do...RUN AWAY. Nobody should be dying during arrest. People that shoot at or get stabby with cops are the exception and this guy wasn't either.
He died of a heart attack. End of story. He was a career criminal. Fuck him.
 

Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!


Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!


Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!


Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!

Pete Bondurant

Veteran Member
Nothing! These guys choked out a fat man to the point of cardiac arrest during an arrest,

And choking out any unarmed man, fat, skinny or in a monkey suit career criminal or

otherwise is a big no no !
He did not die from being choked. He died because he had a heart condition, asthma, and was a fat piece of shit.. He was resisting arrest and had to be subdued. You want police to avoid arresting every unarmed criminal that resists arrest? Are you completely fucking deranged?
 

Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!

lithiumgirl

Pretty Nice Troll
You want police to avoid arresting every unarmed criminal that resists arrest? Are you completely fucking deranged?
I'd like the police to make a good arrest, because there is a difference you know...between

a good arrest and a bad one ... for instance, when officers carry out a good arrest

the paramedics don't show up.
 

Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!

BostonBurns

Insufferable Bastard
Bold Member!
The fat fuck died of a heart attack while resisting arrest. The Obama administration wants to make a federal case out of something that does not merit such scrutiny. They did this with that little bastard Trayvon Martin, and it blew up in their face.
I was going to hit, "awesome response," til I read the link to Treyvon Martin. Treyvon Martin was harmlessly minding his own fucking business and that lunatic had no right to stalk him and had been told specifically not to do it. My 16 year old self would have absolutely confronted some weirdo following me through the neighborhood . Hell, Martin probably thought he was a diddler or something .

That being said, the other sack of shit is 90% responsible for his own demise; I'd say 100 if the EMT's had worked him like they should have .
 

Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!

anglee77

Active Member
Le



During or immediately after police contact. Like why are you making me state the obvious?
[doublepost=1477437514,1477437454][/doublepost]

Oh in some way we all are ...[/QUOTE



During or immediately after police contact. Like why are you making me state the obvious?
[doublepost=1477437514,1477437454][/doublepost]

Oh in some way we all are ...
Legacy...I fucking love that movie.
 

Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!

Pete Bondurant

Veteran Member
I was going to hit, "awesome response," til I read the link to Treyvon Martin. Treyvon Martin was harmlessly minding his own fucking business and that lunatic had no right to stalk him and had been told specifically not to do it. My 16 year old self would have absolutely confronted some weirdo following me through the neighborhood . Hell, Martin probably thought he was a diddler or something .

That being said, the other sack of shit is 90% responsible for his own demise; I'd say 100 if the EMT's had worked him like they should have .
Trayvon Martin was beating up the neighbourhood watch volunteer. If he hadn't been shot, he would have been arrested for assault. He was a thug.
 

Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!

Satanica

Veteran Member
Bold Member!
http://us.cnn.com/2017/12/25/us/eric-garner-daughter-heart-attack/index.html
(CNN)The eldest daughter of Eric Garner, who died after a New York City police officer put him in a chokehold, is in a coma after suffering a heart attack, according to multiple reports.

In a series of tweets, Erica Garner's verified Twitter account asked people to pray for the activist.
"The Garner/Snipes family wants to thank you all for your prayers and support. At this moment there are no updates on Ericas condition," the tweet said. "They ask that you take this holiday to enjoy your loved ones and for self care. More updates will come as they are available."
[....]
Garner's mother, Esaw Snipes, told The New York Times that her daughter was in a medically induced coma following a heart attack, the newspaper reported.
[....]
In the wake of her father's death, Erica Garner became an activist and offered her perspective to the Black Lives Matter movement. She told CNN's Don Lemon she believed her father's death had more to do with police misconduct than race.

"I can't really say it's a black and white issue," she said. "It's about the police officer and abusing their power."

During the 2016 Democratic presidential primaries, she endorsed Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont and prominently appeared in an ad for his campaign.

"I feel like a representative for people throughout this whole nation because I'm doing this. I'm speaking out, me being his daughter," she said in the ad. "That's what I want to do. I just want to tell my truth."
[....]
 

Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!


Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!


Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!


Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!

ChaosKitty

Queen Bitch From Hell
Evidently Talcum X... I mean Shaun King... just left her bedside. There is SOME brain activity. I don't know how much.
She's not... well, she's not dead yet.
thanks, that is weird as multiple stories are apparently still coming out, I did read more than 4 over the brain dead lack of activity & know how in her condition many times the machines are what are aiding in the basics.
 

Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!

Erica Garner, activist daughter of Eric Garner, dies at 27 after coma

Erica Garner, who became an activist for police reform after her father's words of "I can't breathe" were used as a rallying cry for a movement, died Saturday after being in a coma for several days, according to a statement posted to her official Twitter account. She was 27.

Garner, the oldest daughter of Eric Garner, suffered from cardiac arrest a week prior and was being hospitalized in Brooklyn, New York, her family said.

"Erica the world loves you. I love you. I am glad you came into our lives," family members said in a tweet. "May you find the peace in the next life that you deserved while you were here."
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/erica-garner-activist-daughter-eric-garner-dies-27-after-coma-n832626
 

Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!


Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!


Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!

Satanica

Veteran Member
Bold Member!
https://www.nbcdfw.com/news/national-international/NYPD-Officer-Daniel-Pantaleo-Disciplinary-Hearing-Eric-Garner-Death-488322031.html
The NYPD announced on Monday that it will allow disciplinary proceedings to go forward against a patrolman accused in the notorious chokehold death of an unarmed black man, saying it's run out of patience with federal authorities' indecision about whether to bring a criminal case.

On the eve of the four-year anniversary of Eric Garner's killing, a pointed letter from the NYPD's top lawyer informed the U.S. Department of Justice of an administrative case that could result in dismissal for the white officer, Daniel Pantaleo, because "there is no end in sight" to the federal probe.

Typically, the department waits for federal prosecutors to conclude civil rights violations inquiries before taking action. But other probes have taken far less time than the case of a victim whose dying words, "I can't breathe," became a slogan for the Black Lives Matter movement.

"Based on our most recent conversations, it has become clear that a definite date by which time a final decision by the U.S. DOJ will be rendered in this matter cannot be predicted," Lawrence Byrne, deputy commissioner for legal matters, wrote to prosecutor Paige Fitzgerald.

"The NYPD has come to the conclusion that given the extraordinary passage of time since the incident without a final decision on the U.S. DOJ's criminal investigation, any further delay in moving ahead with our own disciplinary proceedings can no longer be justified," Byrne added.

A police watchdog agency, the Civilian Complaint Review Board, will prosecute Panteleo under a memorandum of understanding with the NYPD, according to Byrne.

In a statement, the DOJ said it already told the Police Department in the spring it could go forward and that the move "does not have any bearing on the decision-making timeline."

A lawyer for Pantaleo, who's been on paid desk duty, declined comment on Monday. Pat Lynch, head of the Patrolmen's Benevolent Association, called on DOJ to close its case but said that the officer deserves due process in the disciplinary process.
[....]
 

Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!

lithiumgirl

Pretty Nice Troll
Wow ... he's still getting paid.

Maybe if that -- still going to get paid until it goes through the courts --- policy, was eliminated officer would be on their best behaviour all the time, instead of just some of the time.
 

Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!

Peanut2

Trusted Member
Wow ... he's still getting paid.

Maybe if that -- still going to get paid until it goes through the courts --- policy, was eliminated officer would be on their best behaviour all the time, instead of just some of the time.
You have to keep in mind though, that there are many false complaints made against cops. And they shouldn’t be punished while investigations into those complaints are completed. I worked in social services and we shared many of the same clients. False reports were made to our department ALL the time- certain subcultures behave like that when they’re angry. So the process to sort out the valid complaints from the false complaints needs to be completed without penalty. I mean, we had false complaints come in constantly!
 

Don't like ads? Then help out the site and GO BOLD!

Staff online

Top