' Mississippi Burning' Killer Edgar Killen, 89, Still Believes In Segregation

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Whisper

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Oct 13, 2008
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Last Igloo On The Left
#1
Tight-lipped: In his recent interview, Killen wouldn't say much about the 1964 killings. He said he remains a segregationist who does not believe in race equality but contends he bears no ill will toward blacks

Craggy-faced and ornery, Edgar Ray Killen bears the signs of his 89 years. His hands are still scarred and rough from decades
[....]
He has a muscular build even as he maneuvers in his wheelchair. Time has not softened his views and he remains an ardent segregationist.
[...]
steadfastly refuses to discuss the 'Freedom Summer' slayings of three civil-rights workers, which sparked national outrage, helped spur passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and landed him behind bars.

Killen was interviewed
[...]
inside the Mississippi State Penitentiary, where he is serving a 60-year sentence; it was his first interview since his conviction on state charges of manslaughter in 2005, 41 years to the day after James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner were killed and buried in a red clay dam.
[...]
wouldn't say much about the 1964 killings. He said he remains a segregationist who does not believe in race equality but contends he bears no ill will toward blacks.

The three civil-rights workers — black Mississippian Chaney and white New Yorkers Schwerner and Goodman — were investigating the burning of a black church outside
[....]
when they were stopped on an accusation of speeding and held for hours in the Neshoba County jail.
[...]
that Killen rounded up carloads of Klansmen to intercept the three men upon their release and helped arrange for a bulldozer to hide the bodies.

The bodies were found 44 days later
[...]
In his four-hour interview with the AP, Killen is talkative but his mind wanders, a problem he attributes to brain damage from a logging accident a few months before his trial. He says he has never and will never talk about the events that became immortalized in the film 'Mississippi Burning.'
[...]
In his first letter on March 3, 2013, he made clear that no conversation with a reporter would result in a confession.

'T'hat is not where I am coming from after 50 years of silence,' Killen wrote. 'I have never discussed the 1964 case with anyone — an attorney, the FBI, local law nor friend — and those who say so are lying.'
[...]
repeated requests to have a reporter added to his visitation list. The Mississippi Department of Corrections, citing a policy of not allowing media to see inmates, denied at least a dozen requests. The agency abruptly agreed this month.
[...]
Killen often leans in because he has trouble hearing and cups a hand to his left ear in the direction of guests sitting farther away.

He speaks of associations with hundreds of people during his life — from political figures to friends and neighbors. Killen is talkative about corruption in the Mississippi prison system, his good times and close relationship with the late Sen. James O. Eastland and his preaching at a tiny Baptist church
[...]
from which he got the nickname 'Preacher.'
[...]
his wife said no friends visit or write her husband.
[...]
Killen said people at Parchman were well aware of his identity before he arrived.

'Oh yes. They knew who I was,' he said.
[...]
he had some run-ins with black prisoners and had received threats but nothing ever came from them.

He won't talk about his well-known association with the Ku Klux Klan as an organizer. He does say he knew some people in the KKK.
[...]
question about what he thought of the testimony of friends at his trial drew his anger.

'Friends? What friends? You talking about Winstead?'

Mike Winstead testified that he was 10 years old and sitting on his grandfather's porch one Sunday
[...]
listening to Killen and his grandfather talk.

'My grandfather asked him, did he have anything to do with those boys being killed,' said Winstead, who was serving a 30-year sentence for rape. 'He told my grandfather yes, and he was proud of it.'
[...]
said he didn't know Winstead, and never visited the house.

'I think I would remember if I did that,'
[...]
Chaney's sister, the Rev. Julia Chaney Moss
[....]
said she was not surprised Killen wouldn't talk about the slayings.

'I can only wish Mr. Killen peace at this juncture in his life. ... If he can achieve a modicum of peace, I wish that for him,'
[...]
Killen's first trial on federal conspiracy charges was held in 1967, but the all-white jury could not reach a verdict. One juror said she could not convict a preacher.
[...]
Because many of those who testified in 1967 were no longer available, prosecutors got permission to have others read transcripts of the earlier testimony into the new court record.
[...]
convergence of factors led to a new trial in 2005. There was a new district attorney and Mississippi attorney general, persistent media coverage and advocacy groups urging a closer look.
[...]
2005 trial, Attorney General Jim Hood acknowledged that Killen did not shoot the men himself, but said Killen's role as organizer made him just as guilty as those who fired the guns.
[...]
read in court showed Killen ordered fellow Klansmen to attack Schwerner, Chaney and Goodman and then went to a funeral home to create an alibi for himself.

James Jordan, a Klansman who has since died, testified for the prosecution
[...]
that Killen showed the killers where the men were jailed and where to wait to hunt them down once they were released. As carloads of Klansmen drove off to intercept the three doomed men, Jordan said, they let Killen off at a funeral home.

'He said he had to go there because if anything happened, he would be the first one questioned,'
[...]
Killen's only response today to any of that was his often repeated contention that he is not a criminal convict but a political prisoner.
[...]
'I could have beat that thing if I'd had the mental ability,' Killen said, tapping his bald head.
SOURCES
http://article.wn.com/view/2014/12/22/No_confession_and_no_remorse_from_Mississippi_Burning_killer/
&
http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/...llen-mississippi-burning-murders-wont-confess


Victims: The bodies of civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner (seen from left to right) were found buried in a dam in 1964 -- 44 days after they went missing
National attention: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is seen with a photo of the victims in December 1964 during a press conference after it emerged that 20 men were arrested in connection to the slayings
Scene: This June 1964 file photograph shows the burned station wagon driven by James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Mickey Schwerner, which was found shortly after their disappearance
Slayings: This 1964 photo released by the FBI shows the uncovered bodies of the victims from an earthen dam southwest of Philadelphia, Mississippi
 

JackBurton

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#5
One juror said she could not convict a preacher.
This dipshit should have been locked away herself.

Craggy-faced and ornery, Edgar Ray Killen bears the signs of his 89 years.
Poor choice of words there. This isn't some cranky, misbehavin, hilarious old grandpa. He's not fucking Frank from Everybody Loves Rayman. He's a fucking racist involved in the murders of 3 people. Ornery? He's a straight fucking scumbag. Dipshits always trying play up the sweet old man, the harmless elderly, the funny senior citizen bullshit, even if it's someone convicted for one of the most notorious crimes of the 60s. Sickening.
 

Sugar Cookie

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#6
The 1960s Ku Klux Klan leader convicted decades later in the 'Mississippi Burning' slayings of three civil rights workers died in prison Thursday night at the age of 92.

Edgar Ray Killen was serving three consecutive 20-year terms for manslaughter when he died 9pm Thursday inside the Mississippi State Penitentiary.

An autopsy was pending, but no foul play was suspected, a state corrections department statement said.

His conviction came 41 years to the day after James Chaney, Michael Schwerner and Andrew Goodman, all in their 20s, were ambushed and killed by Klansmen.

The three Freedom Summer workers had been investigating the burning of a black church near Philadelphia, Mississippi when a deputy sheriff arrested them on a traffic charge.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...-Burnings-Klan-leader-Killen-dies-prison.html
 

Stormcloud

Infinite Diversity in Infinite Combinations
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#9
And good riddance. Now he's dead, maybe the relatives of his victims can start to heal.

Believed in segregation yet held 'no ill will' towards anyone? Bullshit.
 

JackBurton

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#10
No one has done it yet?

I will...

Good thing he died before Trump could pardon him.

I don't actually hold extreme views like that about the president, but it's too obvious and easy a joke not to make. Have fun with it.
 

cubby

Live Long and Prosper
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Piney Woods
#13
. One juror said she could not convict a preacher.
Prolly truly thought she'd go to straight hell if she convicted a WHITE preacher.

That being said, that is not the way everybody thinks in the south. I can remember when desegregation happened in schools here I remember thinking I could not figure out what the hell the problem was letting black kids go to school with the rest of us. I've never figured it out.

My younger son's best friend in the second grade was a little black boy named Carey. My son, Corey told me once that everbody at school couldn't figure out which kd was Corey and which kid was Carey. I called them Pete and Repete. Children learn what you teach them.
 

roadsidehorror

Slippy like the Manson Family
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10050 Cielo Drive
#17
I've only met one Klansman in my life. When I was 19 and living in Charlotte. I was working a second job ,part time at a Roses department store. Myself, a white kid and a black kid I worked with took our break and were sitting in a car smoking it up. Next thing I know some old white dude is banging on the window screaming about niggers and potheads. I flipped out! He started trying to hit me, I knocked him back. I look at the fellas I was with and they both look terrified of this little old bastard. Turns out he was the white kids Grandpa and he was the Grand Dragon of the local or state Klan! I believe his name was Virgil Griffin or some shit. Long story short. I was a little paranoid for awhile after that incident. Fuck the Klan!

Respect my neighborhood and I'll respect yours..
 

FrayedKnot

I drank what?
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Coventry
#18
I've only met one Klansman in my life. When I was 19 and living in Charlotte. I was working a second job ,part time at a Roses department store. Myself, a white kid and a black kid I worked with took our break and were sitting in a car smoking it up. Next thing I know some old white dude is banging on the window screaming about niggers and potheads. I flipped out! He started trying to hit me, I knocked him back. I look at the fellas I was with and they both look terrified of this little old bastard. Turns out he was the white kids Grandpa and he was the Grand Dragon of the local or state Klan! I believe his name was Virgil Griffin or some shit. Long story short. I was a little paranoid for awhile after that incident. Fuck the Klan!

Respect my neighborhood and I'll respect yours..

I lived in Charlotte, too. And Matthews. I feel you.
 

alifinrox

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#20
i'd still watch chappelle but now he's all different and brainwashed and kinda scary. i respected him when he spoke out against the illuminati... but now he just seems fake imho
 

lithiumgirl

Pretty Nice Troll
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I'm everywhere
#24
Fuck off, you absolute horror of a human being.
Stop ... with the compliments.

I scrape Nazi shit like you off the sole of my shoe.
Please ... they would punch you in the mouth for sure. You're not scrapping any Nazi's, anyplace.

Notice how our systems insist that we capitalise the word Nazi ...